Double Murder Case Gets Re-tried

Commonwealth VS. Carlos Ordway.  Our guests on the show are Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Kimberly Henderson-Baird, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Aspen Carlisle and Detective Rob Wilson.  The defendant was charged with two counts of murder that occurred in 2007 and was tried in 2010. This was a retrial due to some evidentiary issues and it was tried again in the summer of 2014.

The facts of the case are that Carlos Ordway and the two male victims were on their way from Louisville to Lexington together in a car. Carlos was the passenger and one victim was driving and the other victim was in the back seat.  They were on Appian Way when the defendant decided to pull a gun and shoot the victims multiple times. He shot the driver two times and then turned around and shot the victim in the back seat four times.  When the driver was shot it caused the vehicle to crash into a parked SUV. The defendant was seen by witnesses getting out of the car and walking away, but he then turned back around went to the car opened the door and shot the driver one more time and the victim in the back seat one more time at close range in the eye.  The defendant tried to get into a car that was parked at the red light but they pulled away.  He then started to walk around in the middle of the road in circles mumbling until the EMS and police showed up. The Defendant was taken into custody at that time after being questioned.

The defendant went to trial in 2010 and a jury found him guilty of two counts of murder and sentenced him to Death.  However, due to the evidentiary issues the conviction was overturned and the defendant was once again set to go to trial.  The case was tried in June of 2014 and the Jury found Carlos Ordway guilty once again of two counts of murder.  They sentenced him to two terms of Life without the possibility for parole for 25 years.

IMG_7794

Ordway

Defendant: Carlos Ordway




Coming Soon to American DA Live

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The case we will be discussing on Forensic Friday with Ray the DA and Jack Pattie is Commonwealth VS. Carlos Ordway.  Our guests on the show will be Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Kimberly Henderson-Baird, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Aspen Carlisle and Detective Rob Wilson.  The defendant was charged with two counts of murder that occurred in 2007 and was tried in 2010. This was a retrial due to some evidentiary issues and it was tried again in the summer of 2014.

The facts of the case are that Carlos Ordway and the two male victims were on their way from Louisville to Lexington together in a car. Carlos was the passenger and one victim was driving and the other victim was in the back seat.  They were on Appian Way when the defendant decided to pull a gun and shoot the victims multiple times. He shot the driver two times and then turned around and shot the victim in the back seat four times.  When the driver was shot it caused the vehicle to crash into a parked SUV. The defendant was seen by witnesses getting out of the car and walking away, but he then turned back around went to the car opened the door and shot the driver one more time and the victim in the back seat one more time at close range in the eye.  The defendant tried to get into a car that was parked at the red light but they pulled away.  He then started to walk around in the middle of the road in circles mumbling until the EMS and police showed up. The Defendant was taken into custody at that time after being questioned.

The defendant went to trial in 2010 and a jury found him guilty of two counts of murder and sentenced him to Death.  However, due to the evidentiary issues the conviction was overturned and the defendant was once again set to go to trial.  The case was tried in June of 2014 and the Jury found Carlos Ordway guilty once again of two counts of murder.  They sentenced him to two terms of Life without the possibility for parole for 25 years.

Kimberly Henderson-Baird

Kimberly Henderson-Baird

Aspen Carlisle

Aspen Carlisle

Det. Rob WIlson

Carlos Ordway

Defendant: Carlos Ordway

 




THIS WEEK!

1. 63% of Criminals Were Probated!

2. 52% of Probation Violators Were Re-Probated!

 

 

Sentencing-Score-Card





CHICAGO RESIDENTS ARE ARMING THEMSELVES AND IT’S WORKING

Chicago crime rate drops as concealed carry applications surge.
City sees fewer homicides, robberies, burglaries, car thefts as Illinois residents take arms.

Kelly RiddellTHE WASHINGTON TIMES
By Kelly Riddell

An 86-year-old Illinois man with a concealed carry permit fired his weapon at an armed robbery suspect fleeing police last month, stopping the man in his tracks and allowing the police to make an arrest.

Law enforcement authorities described the man as “a model citizen” who “helped others avoid being victims” at an AT&T store outside Chicago where he witnessed the holdup. The man, whose identity was withheld from the press, prevented others from entering the store during the theft.

PHOTOS: Best concealed carry handguns

Police said the robber harassed customers and pistol-whipped one.

Since Illinois started granting concealed carry permits this year, the number of robberies that have led to arrests in Chicago has declined 20 percent from last year, according to police department statistics. 1. Reports of burglary and motor vehicle theft are down 20 percent and 26 percent, respectively. In the first quarter,
2. the city’s homicide rate was at a 56-year low.

“It isn’t any coincidence crime rates started to go down when concealed carry was permitted. Just the idea that the criminals don’t know who’s armed and who isn’t has a deterrence effect,” said Richard Pearson, executive director of the Illinois State Rifle Association. “The police department hasn’t changed a single tactic — they haven’t announced a shift in policy or of course — and yet you have these incredible numbers.”

As of July 29 the state had 83,183 applications for concealed carry and had issued 68,549 licenses. By the end of the year, Mr. Pearson estimates, 100,000 Illinois citizens will be packing. When Illinois began processing requests in January, gun training and shooting classes — which are required for the application — were filling up before the rifle association was able to schedule them, Mr. Pearson said.




THIS IS A VERY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE ABOUT POLICE “USE OF FORCE” ISSUES FACED BY THE POLICE ON BEHALF OF OUR CTIZENS

According to Bureau of Justice Statistics data from 2008, there roughly 765,000 sworn officers in the United States — and an absurdly small number ever fire their weapons outside of training

Due to the success of American policing, our citizenry is able to remain blissfully unaware of the terrible dynamics of encountering an attack or resistance. That success fortunately means that most people are safely protected from harm but it also means there are some common concerns and misconceptions about what it’s like to be attacked, and importantly, what it’s like to respond to an attack.

This is largely responsible for the chorus of questions about the officer-involved shooting in Ferguson. It probably makes it more likely that you’ll be asked these questions by the people you protect.

If you find yourself in such a discussion, here are some facts you might use to generate deeper understanding for them.

1. “Why did the officer shoot him so many times?”
Shooting events are over far faster than most people think. According to a scientifically-validated study on reaction times, the time from a threat event to recognition of the threat (the decision making process) is 31/100 second. The mechanical action of pulling the trigger is as fast as 6/100 of a second.

Continue reading




Interning with the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office

Nikki

 By: Nikki Fedorko

My name is Nikki Fedorko.  I was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Upon high school graduation, I moved to Kentucky to start my undergraduate career.

In 2011, I earned my Bachelor’s degree in Special Education-Learning and Behavior Disorders from the University of Kentucky.  I am starting my second year of graduate school at the University of Kentucky; I will graduate in May of 2015 with my Masters in Social Work.

I thoroughly enjoyed teaching special education in Fayette County.  However, I realized that my talents, interests, and objectives would be better suited outside of the classroom.  I became interested in social work and the criminal justice field in general after I realized how many of my students were in and out of the court system. A multitude of them were defendants, but a majority of them were victims.  These students are often over-looked in the school system and in the community in general.  I hope to be able to serve individuals with disabilities in my future career.

My interests in social work and advocacy vary, but one constant always remains the same for me: I want to be an advocate for victims.  I am currently contemplating applying for law school upon graduation.  I am confident that this amazing opportunity with Fayette County Commonwealth’s Attorney office will not only provide me with a high-quality, “hands-on” learning experience, but it will also guide me when pursuing my future aspirations.




David Eugene Matthews

Matthews

David Eugene Matthews Then and Now.

Male/White 33 years old at the time.

Victims: Mary Matthews, Magdalene Cruse

On June 29, 1981 David Matthews burglarized the home of his estranged wife, Mary Matthews’, in Jefferson County. He executed Magdalene Cruse, his mother-in-law, by shooting her in the back of the head: she agonized and convulsed for 8 hours before dying.

David Eugene Matthews was tried and convicted on October 8, 1982. He was then sentenced to death November 11, 1982.



 
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