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Deterrence of Crime

MDRMichael Rushford, President of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, the posted a real world example of deterrence v. tolerance of crime.

 On Deterrence of Crime

July 16, 2014

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Last year, many of us enjoyed watching Tom Hanks play thetitle role in the movie Captain Phillips. Remember, he had to deal with the takeover of a freighter by pirates off the Somalian coast.


images (1)The movie, which was based on a true story, bothered me because, while piracy in those waters was a nationally reported issue and well known to freighter companies and crews at the time the Maersk Alabama was captured, these huge ships remained virtually defenseless to the lightly armed groups of unsophisticated pirates in small boats.

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DAILY DOSE OF RAY the D.A.

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Kentucky isn’t the only state with wimpy ways to deal with Repeat FELONY OFFENDERS.

California’s “prisoner reduction program” (translation: Catch & Release) makes it difficult for them to catch the “REPEAT FELONY OFFENDERS” too.

1st – the program classified an offender as non-violent based solely on the offender’s last felony conviction rather than his entire criminal record even though many violent criminals also commit non-violent crimes;

2nd – the program fails to provide for significant incapacitation of repeat offenders, e.g., habitual thieves and burglars, who repeat their crimes secure in the knowledge that repeat offenses will not result in major incarceration as many are released after serving very short times in jails and without any significant enforcement of restitution.

3rd – Felony offenders classified as “non-violent” are required to serve their sentences in local jails, and most local jails are filled to capacity necessitating early release of most offenders.

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Daily Crime Fighters’ News Blast from Ray the D.A.

LB8ML.AuSt.79WTVQ-TV Reporter Adam Adelson reports that Prosecutors and Police need Citizen Involvement to solve crimes in Lexington.
COME ON CRIME-FIGHTERS LET’S DO OUR PART!

 

After a rash of violent crimes in Lexington, prosecutors and police are asking the community for help in solving the cases.
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A DAILY DOSE OF RAY THE D.A.

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WITNESS FEAR THREATENS JUSTICE

In too many of our cities across America criminals are getting away with murder and other crimes because witnesses to those crimes are afraid to come forward.

One of the keys to our criminal justice system is the testimony of witnesses to crimes. Citizen involvement.

In Baltimore, Maryland, like so many other cities, drug dealers and gang leaders use any means to keep people from talking to the police. Baltimore, Md. State’s Attorney, Patricia Jessamy has called the loss of witnesses because they are scared away from testifying “a public safety crisis.”

Witness fear is nothing less than “URBAN TERRORISM,” and it threatens the integrity of the entire criminal justice system.




A DAILY DOSE OF RAY the D.A.

LB8ML.AuSt.79

 

WHY DO OUR LEGISLATORS HAVE TO KEEP RE-LEARNING THE SAME LESSON OVER AND OVER?

 

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In the 1960’s Incarceration of Law-Breakers, like today, was basically eliminated.

RESULT? The crime rate quadrupled.

Then in the 1980’s the public got scared and demanded that criminals be punished for committing crimes.
RESULT? The crime rates dropped dramatically.

These days we are back to the same old ideas of the 1960’s.
No punishment for law-breakers.
RESULT? Our legislators and judges can’t seem to learn from our past mistakes, and our citizens are paying the high price.

WHY DID THE CRIME RATE DROP IN THE 1980’s?
More law-breakers were sent to prison

Why did that drop in crime occur? Police chiefs credit improved police work. Demographers cite the aging population. Some claim it was more cops on the street.

I’m sure all of these played some part in the dramatic drop in our nation’s crime rate, but the real and consistent factor in the drop in the crime rate is the steep rise in the number of career criminals sent to prison.

In his book, WHY CRIME RATES FELL, Tufts University sociologist John Conklin concluded that half of the drop in crime rate was due to “more people in prison.”

A little history:
Sentencing by judges in the 1960s and ‘70s became much more lenient and because the likelihood of punishment for committing a crime dropped significantly, the crime started to rise dramatically.

State law-makers responded to the crime wave by building prisons and mandating tough sentences. The number of inmates increased and the crime rate dropped dramatically.

Not a popular conclusion among the “let’em out” liberal academicians, criminologists and editorial boards:

Many liberal professors and criminologists who seem to populate our colleges and universities don’t like or don’t agree with the common-sense conclusion that:

When the incarceration rate is up – the crime rate is down, and
When the incarceration rate is down – the crime rate is up.

History and the statistics cannot be ignored no matter how hard they try. Incarceration works to reduce the crime rate.

Study after study has found that a small percentage of the criminals commit the vast majority of crime. It makes great sense to us that the arrest, conviction and incarceration of this small percentage of repeat offenders will and has reduced the crime rate not only in our community, but across America.

Heather Mac Donald, of the Manhattan Institute, said it well: Data-driven police work and tougher sentencing are the answer to crime – - not social welfare programs.




WHAC-A-MOLE!!

5 More Repeat Felony Offenders Last Week!

- 1 Violent Offense Case of 1st Degree Assault.

- 2 Drug Related Offenses, Both of Which were 1st Degree Traffic in Controlled Substance Cases.

- 2 Property Related Offenses, Both of Which were 2nd Degree Burglary Cases.

These Repeat Felony Offenders Collectively Have 76 Prior Convictions With an Average of 15.2 Convictions per Offender!

Since 2014 There Have Been 201 Repeat Felony Offenders. Collectively, These Felons Have 3396 Prior Convictions With an Average of 16.9 Convictions per Offender!

 

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